Tincunacuy (en)

“Tincunacuy” is a word from the indigenous Quichua idiom and roughly translates to “to meet in friendship.” “Tincunacuy” is a short film. It builds a bridge between the two independent feature films “Sachamanta” (Special Mention at the Festival delle Terre…

Tincunacuy (en)

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“Tincunacuy” is a word from the indigenous Quichua idiom and roughly translates to “to meet in friendship.” “Tincunacuy” is a short film. It builds a bridge between the two independent feature films “Sachamanta” (Special Mention at the Festival delle Terre 2013) and “No Rest. No Haste.” (out now).

“Tincunacuy” shows the return of our film “Sachamanta” to the people whose story it tells: The indigenous farmers of the Santiago del Estero region in northern Argentina. These small scale farmers ([email protected]) constantly fight back large companies, that try to steal the land from the farmers. It is a land-grabbing-story so different from all the other stories on this globe. Because in Santiago del Estero the weak beat the strong and there are reasons for this unusual outcome. “Sachamanta” tells you the story of these reasons: organization and communication! With the simplest means the [email protected] build five FM radio stations and by them efficiently coordinate the fight against companies like Monsanto in a land where there is often not even electricity.

This story of the amazing victory of the weak over the strong deeply touched people in the Federal Republic of Germany, where “Sachamanta” hast first been screened. They asked questions and they wrote down their messages in a little mass of letters to the [email protected] Of course these messages and also the film “Sachamanta” had to return home across the pond to the people they belonged to. And that is, what they did. With the financial, logistical and ideological support of over one hundred people (project “Espejo”) at the end of 2012 we started off again towards the north of Argentina. In the luggage we had not only the film and the many letters and messages, but also our equipment. We traveled from radio station to radio station and from place to place and mostly we screened the film “Sachamanta” on one of the outer wall of some house in the warm summer nights of southern New Year, the sound of the film putting up with the omnipresent crickets. “Tincunacuy” tells a little of this long journey. This short film is giving something like the exterior view on the reactions of [email protected] on “Sachamanta” and on the questions of the german audience.

However, the letters and messages brought forth yet a second film, which is concerns with an internal view. Because of the questions, ideas and reflections that “Sachamanta” brought to light, we seemed to be somewhat guided when we were outlining the interviews for a new feature film: “No Rest. No Haste.”

When in the letters people were asking, who exactly the embattled land belonged to legally, we asked this question over and over. When there was questions on the sacrifices of the fight over the land, then we went after the names and lives of the people who are now no longer living. Finally we also went after all the news events in the region, that the audience of “Sachamanta” wanted to learn more about. So one could really say, that it were the people that watched “Sachamanta” that also shaped “No Rest. No Haste.”

More information: https://kameradisten.org

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