The Big lifts workshop – Trailer

A five hour live workshop focusing on the flexibility, control drills, squats, bench, dead lift and the snatch. This video series explores the concepts and techniques that Ian King has developed around the ‘big lifts’. These lifts include the squat,…

The Big lifts workshop - Trailer

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A five hour live workshop focusing on the flexibility, control drills, squats, bench, dead lift and the snatch.

This video series explores the concepts and techniques that Ian King has developed around the ‘big lifts’. These lifts include the squat, bench press and deadlift from the sport powerlifting; and the the clean, snatch and presses from the sport of Olympic lifting – all of which have been used extensively in a variety of strength sport endeavors.

Thanks for that video, Ian, learned a lot and tried it out, did pretty good and I felt the legs more than the hips,
–Tom

Ian! Just did squats today. Thanks for your willingness to share your expertise.
–Monica Garza-Penrod‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‪

As usual an excellent and highly professional treatment, of the highest quality!–Joe MacGowan‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‪

Australian strength coach Ian King’s “Limping Legs” and “Super Strength” programs are texts for just about every program I write. Macro cycles and individual workouts that include wildly different set/rep schemes start, in my head at least, here, with these programs written nearly 20 years ago.

Many fields that have a foundational texts that addresses just about all of the big ideas that come after. Even if these works are not precisely correct about everything, they do seem to say it all first and best. Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War and Clausewitz’s On War served these functions when I was an international relations and strategic studies guy respectively.

To use strategic studies language (imperfectly, I know), I would argue that “Limping Legs” and “Super Strength” speak to strategic, operational, and tactical components of physical preparation. King questions the very purpose of strength training, the costs of every component of the workout, and how exactly training is supposed to advance the objectives. He systematically considers and rationalizes the development of specific physical qualities alongside the arrangement of movement patterns, corrective exercise, exercise variations, and loading techniques through the macro, meso, and micro cycle. All of this leads to programs that emphasize recovery, minimal volume, and precise manipulation of acute training variables. There is no fancy periodization and no body bashing, and a complete disinterest in gym performance for its own sake. This is truly functional training.–Sam Abrams, USA

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